Friday, 3 August 2018

Children’s Books 1850–1881 part 10

This first series features books from between the 1850s to 1881.
Books from between 1881 to 1904 will appear here later in the year.

Until the mid-18th century, children's books mainly consisted of moralistic or enlightening stories propagating the religious and ethical view that hard work and diligence determines a person's life. Little consideration was given to children's reading pleasure.

The focus in children's books gradually shifted from simple moral lessons to entertainment, with techniques of expression employed specifically for that purpose. Books carrying witty illustrations or exploring children's inner life also began to appear. The mid-19th century saw the development of girls' novels and narratives of family life.


This is part 10 of an 11-part series on children's books 1850s - 1881:



1880 The Headlong Career and Wo(e)ful Ending of Precocious Piggy
published by Griffith & Farran, London:




























1880 The Little Pussy Cats
published by Ward, Lock & Tyler, London:


Ebenezer Ward and George Lock starting a publishing concern in 1854 which became known as "Ward and Lock". Based originally in Fleet Street, London,  it outgrew its offices and in 1878 moved completely to Salisbury Square, London.

Charles T. Tyler joined Ward and Lock as a partner in 1865 and the firm became Ward, Lock and Tyler. Tyler seems to have bought capital to the company and was a financial adviser. Tyler remained with the firm for eight years, ceasing to be a partner in 1873, when it title reverted to that of Ward and Lock.























1880s Good-Night Stories for Little Folks:











































1881 Buttercup's Visit to Little Stay-at-Home
published by E.P. Dutton & Co., Boston, MA :

E.P. Dutton was an American book publishing company founded as a book retailer in Boston, Massachusetts, in 1852 by Edward Payson Dutton.























1881 Golden Days of Childhood Picture Book:




























































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