Monday, 21 October 2019

Charles Dana Gibson - part 2


Born in Roxbury, Massachusetts, Charles Dana Gibson attended the Art Students League in New York, studying with Thomas Eakins and Kenyon Cox. Hugely successful at the turn of the century, he left New York from 1905 to 1907 to study painting in France, Spain, and Italy.

Gibson's name is still remembered for its association with the icon he created, the "Gibson Girl." This idealised, refined upper-middle-class woman became so popular that she was featured in stage plays, and her image was printed on a variety of domestic objects. The highest-paid illustrator of his time, in 1904 Gibson accepted a contract from Collier's Weekly, which paid him $100,000 for one hundred illustrations over four years. Gibson's illustrations gently satirised public life and mores. During World War I, as president of the Society of Illustrators, Gibson formed and became head of the Division of Pictorial Publicity under the Federal Committee of Public Information. Through this program, prominent illustrators were recruited to design posters, billboards, and other publicity for the war effort. His involvement with publicity during the war led Gibson to become owner and editor of Life, a New York-based magazine filled with short articles and illustrations. In the early 1930s Gibson retired in order to devote more time to painting.

For more information about Charles Dana Gibson, and for earlier works, see part 1 also.

This is part 2 of a 12-part series on the works of Charles Dana Gibson:

1896 Pictures of People 

1896 Pictures of People
 A little Story.
By a Sleeve


1896 The Last Day of Summer.
 Life magazine

1896 The People of Charles Dickens
Scrooge
Ladies' Home Journal

1896 When you are Bored.
Life Publishing Co.

1897 "Yes, that's just it," she answered.

1897 At the Pavilion
pencil on paper 49.5 x 73 cm

1897 February Scribner's
poster 52 x 38 cm

1897 Gibson Girls
pen and ink on paper
Life Publishing Co.

1897 Has Grover got it? - The Second Term Nightmare
pen and ink 30.5 x 44.5 cm

1897 The People of Charles Dickens
VI - Caleb Plummer and his daughter - from "The Cricket on the Hearth"

1897 When Doctors Disagree.
 pen and ink on paper
Life Publishing Co.

1897 Wild Enthusiasm at the Horse Show.
During a Critical Event in the Ring.
life Publishing Co.

1897-1905 Dick Swiveller and the Marchioness, from "The Old Curiosity Shop"
  photogravure
Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, DC

1897-1905 Mr. and Mrs. Micawber, David Copperfield and Traddles, from "David Copperfield"
photogravure
Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, DC

1897-1905 Scrooge, from "A Christmas Carol"
 photogravure
Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, DC

1897-1905 Tom Pinch and His Sister, from "Martin Chuzzlewit"
photogravure
Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, DC

1898c The Education of Mr. Pip
Life magazine

1898 "Rupert of Hentzau"
McCLure's magazine April 1898

1898 A Study.
 charcoal on paper

1898 Amid Romantic Surroundings. Mr. Pipp finds in Viola, Lady Fitzmaurice, a sympathetic listener: she is much affected by the story of his early life.
Life Publishing Co.

1898 Awakened his Affection.

before 1898 They are only collecting the usual fans and gloves

1898 In Germany.
pen and ink and wash on paper

1898 In the Diplomats' Gallery
lithograph 11 x 15 cm

1898 On the Ferry
pen and ink
Library of Congress, Washington, DC

1898 The latest Nobleman
"Girls, girls, don't press his Grace! He can only take one of you, and with him it is purely a matter of business."

1898 The Story of the Hunt
pen and ink on paper 47 x 67.3 cm

1898 Untitled
pen and ink on paper

1898 Untitled 
pen and ink on paper

1898 Waiting for Bread.
 Life Publishing Co.

1898c Three hatted young women at restaurant, one removing hat
pen and ink
Library of Congress, Washington, DC

1899 "Sally, I'm in Love."
illustration for "Predicaments" by Louis Evan Shipman
Life Publishing
ink on paper 41.9 x 37.5 cm

1897 London as seen by Charles Dana Gibson 
published by Scribner's Sons, New York:

1897 London as seen by Charles Dana Gibson 

A First Night

A Park Orator

After Dinner

At the National Sporting Club

Between Times, Leicester Square

Church Parade

Her first glimpse of Royalty

In the Row
( Rotten Row, Hyde Park )

On Bond Street

Patiently Listening

Phil May

The Rat Man

Waiting

Your Hostess

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