Wednesday, 6 November 2019

Charles Dana Gibson - part 9



Born in Roxbury, Massachusetts, Charles Dana Gibson attended the Art Students League in New York, studying with Thomas Eakins and Kenyon Cox. Hugely successful at the turn of the century, he left New York from 1905 to 1907 to study painting in France, Spain, and Italy.

Gibson's name is still remembered for its association with the icon he created, the "Gibson Girl." This idealised, refined upper-middle-class woman became so popular that she was featured in stage plays, and her image was printed on a variety of domestic objects. The highest-paid illustrator of his time, in 1904 Gibson accepted a contract from Collier's Weekly, which paid him $100,000 for one hundred illustrations over four years. Gibson's illustrations gently satirised public life and mores. During World War I, as president of the Society of Illustrators, Gibson formed and became head of the Division of Pictorial Publicity under the Federal Committee of Public Information. Through this program, prominent illustrators were recruited to design posters, billboards, and other publicity for the war effort. His involvement with publicity during the war led Gibson to become owner and editor of Life, a New York-based magazine filled with short articles and illustrations. In the early 1930s Gibson retired in order to devote more time to painting.

For more information about Charles Dana Gibson see part 1, and for earlier works see parts 1 - 8 also. 

This is part 9 of a 12-part series on the works of Charles Dana Gibson:


1904 Their Daughter in the City.
Collier's Weekly

1904 Their First Meeting - Some Years Ago - Now They Are Married.
Collier's Weekly

1904c A Resolve.
Cousin Kate: Now that you are well off, you mustn't let them say of you, a fool and his money are soon parted.
Charles: No, you bet I won't; I'll show them that I'm an exception to the rule.
pen and ink
 

1904c Have you met him socially?
 Dear me, no, only in a business way: I married his daughter
pen and ink
Library of Congress, Washington, DC

1904c Mrs. Wiggs rents a cottage for the summer: all the comforts of home
pen and ink
Library of Congress, Washington, DC

1904c Studies in Expression.
In the Monkey House
pen and ink
Library of Congress, Washington, DC

1904c Summer Sports
pen and ink over graphite
Library of Congress, Washington, DC

1905 "Keep Still, Please"
Collier's Weekly

1905 "Will you tell my past for two dollars?"
 "No, Madame, not your past. You will have to hire me by the day."
Life Publishing Co.

1905 Another Victim - The Goose Fish.
Collier's Weekly

1905 Asking the Old Folks.
Collier's Weekly

1905 Elopement à la Gasoline.
 Life Publishing Co.

1905 Making up his Mind
Collier's Weekly
October 21 1905

1905 Opening of the Racing Season.
Collier's Weekly

1905 "Is it expensive sending your girls to college?"
"I should say so! My wife takes advantage of their absence to dress about twenty years younger than she really is."
Life Publishing Co.

1905 Seaside Expressions
Collier's Weekly

1905 Serious Business
A Young Lawyer Arguing His First Inportant Case
Collier's Weekly

1905 Sister's New Beau
Life Publishing Co.

1905 The Baby of the Family.
Collier's Weekly

1905 The Boss
published by P.F. Collier & Son

1905 The Morning After
Charles Scribner's Sons

1905 The New Pupil
A Candidate for Post-Graduate Honors
Life Publishing Co.

1905 The Sign Painter
Collier's Weekly

1905 The Thirtieth of May
Collier's Weekly

1905 Trying it On
Life Publishing Co.

1905 Waiting for Something to Turn Up
Scene in any hotel corridor
Collier's Weekly

1905 What Is a Good Title for This Gibson Drawing?
 Good Housekeeping magazine
 
1905 Young Lovers
Life Publishing Co.

1905c Accident to a Young Man with a Weak Heart.

1905c Advice to Bores - Follow your card upstairs and find out what they really think of you.

1905c Captain Nason E. Pendleton
oil on canvas 77 x 66 cm

1905c Skyed
pen and ink
Library of Congress, Washington, DC

1905c The agitator: Who is it's brought us here, I ask you? Who's a-grindin' us under the iron heel o' despotism? I say to you the time has come, when...
pen and ink
Library of Congress, Washington, DC

1905c The Little Dealer
pen and ink
Library of Congress, Washington, DC

1906 A Hint to Fathers.
Don't Destroy a Romance by Meeting Him More Than Half Way.

1906 Advice to Caddies
You will save time by keeping your eye on the ball, not on the player.
pen and ink

before 1906 A Young Man

1906 He: 'Shall we talk or dance?'
'I'm so tired. Let's dance.'
Life Publishing Co.

1906 Picturesque America.
Anywhere along the coast
pen and ink

1905 Our Neighbors 
published by Charles Scribner's Sons:


1905 Our Neighbors by Charles Dana Gibson
published by Charles Scribner's Sons

1905 Our Neighbors
Yes or No
Originally published in Collier's Weekly

1905 Our Neighbors
"Keep Still, Please"
Originally published in Collier's Weekly

1905 Our Neighbors
At the Horse Show (The High Jump)
Originally published in Life magazine

1905 Our Neighbors
Seeing New York (The Flatiron)
Originally published in Collier's Weekly

1905 Our Neighbors
Stage-Struck
Originally published in Collier's Weekly

1905 Our Neighbors
The Spirit of the Day
Originally published in Life magazine.

1905 Our Neighbors
The Story of the Empty Sleeve.
Originally published in Collier's Weekly

1905 Our Neighbors
The Tragedian and His Landlady
Originally published in Collier's Weekly

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