Wednesday, 26 February 2020

Vogue Magazine - part 5

Vogue is a fashion and lifestyle magazine covering many topics including fashion, beauty, culture, living, and runway. Vogue began as a weekly newspaper in 1892 in the United States, before becoming a monthly publication years later.
The British Vogue was the first international edition launched in 1916, while the Italian version Vogue Italia has been called the top fashion magazine in the world. As of today, there are 23 international editions.
In 1892, Arthur Baldwin Turnure, an American businessman, founded Vogue as a weekly newspaper in the United States. From its inception, the magazine targeted the new New York upper class. The magazine at this time was primarily concerned with fashion, with coverage of sports and social affairs included for its male readership.
 Condé Montrose Nast purchased Vogue in 1909 one year before Turnure's death, and gradually grew the publication. He changed it to a unisex magazine and started Vogue overseas in the 1910s. Under Nast, the magazine soon shifted its focus to women, and in turn the price was soon raised. The magazine’s number of publications and profit increased dramatically under Nast’s management. By 1911, the Vogue brand had garnered a reputation that it continues to maintain, targeting an elite audience and expanding into the coverage of weddings. According to Condé Nast Russia, after the First World War made deliveries in the Old World impossible, printing began in England. The decision to print in England proved to be successful causing Nast to release the first issue of French Vogue in 1920.


This is part 5 of a 12-part series on Vogue magazine.
For earlier magazines see parts 1 - 4 also.


1921 December 15
Holiday Number
Cover by Helen Dryden

1922 January 1
Lingerie and Vanity Number
Cover by Georges Lepape

1922 January 15
Motor and Southern Number
Cover by Helen Dryden

1922 February 1
Spring Fabrics and Original Vogue Designs
Cover by Georges Lepape

1922 March 1
Spring Millinery Number
Cover by Helen Dryden

1922 March 15
Smart Fashions for Limited Incomes
Cover by Georges Lepape

1922 April 1
Early Paris Openings and Brides Fashions
Cover by Pierre Brissaud

Pierre Brissaud (1885-1964) was a French illustrator, painter, and engraver working in the Art Deco style. He was born in Paris and trained at the École des Beaux-Arts and Atelier Fernand Cormon in Montmartre, Paris. A fellow student was Georges Lepape, and illustrator also featured in this series. Brissaud is known for his pochoir (stencil) prints for the fashion magazine Gazette de la Mode et du Bon Ton, published by Lucien Vogel, Paris.

His illustrations appeared in Vogue as well as House & Garden and Fortune magazines. In 1907 he exhibited at the Salon des Indépendants and the Salon d'Automne.


1922 May 1
New York Fashions Number
Cover by Georges Lepape

1922 May 15
Summer Homes & Hostess Number
Cover by George Wolfe Plank

1922 June 15
Travel and Resorts Number
Cover by Georges Lepape

1922 July 1
Hot Weather Fashions
Cover by Helen Dryden

1922 July 15
New York in Summer
Cover by George Wolfe Plank

1922 August 1
Interior Decoration Number
Cover by Georges Lepape

1922 August 15
Fashions for Children & Early Autumn Fashions
Cover by Henry R. Sutter

1922 September 1
Autumn Fashions & Vogue Design for Limited Incomes
Cover by Helen Dryden

1922 October 1
Early Paris Openings
Cover by Eduardo Garcia Benito

1922 October 15
Paris Fashions Number
Cover by Helen Dryden

1922 November 1
New York Winter Fashions
Cover by George Wolfe Plank

1922  November 15
Vanity Number
Cover by Georges Lepape

1922 December 1
Christmas Gifts Number
Cover by George Wolfe Plank

1922 December 15
Holiday Number
Cover by Helen Dryden

1922 December 15 
Holiday Number
illustration by Helen Dryden

1922 December 15 
Holiday Number
illustration by Helen Dryden

1923 January 15
Fashions for North and South
Cover by Georges Lepape

1923 January 15 
Southern Fashions & Motors 
Cover by George Wolfe Plank

1923 March 1
Millinery for Spring 1923
Cover by Helen Dryden

1923 March 15
Spring Shopping Number
Cover by Harriet Meserole

1923 April 1
The Early Paris Openings
Cover by Georges Lepape

1923 April 17
Paris Fashions Number
Cover by George Wolfe Plank

1923 May 1
New York Fashions
Cover by Henry R. Sutter

1923 June 1
Summer Fashions Number
Cover by Georges Lepape

1923 June 15
Travel, Resorts & Summer Homes
Cover by Pierre Brissaud

1923 July 1
Hot Weather Fashions
Cover by George Wolfe Plank

1923 August 1
New Ideas for Interior Decorating
Cover by Georges Lepape

1923 August 15
Early Autumn Fashions & Fashions for Children
Cover by Marie Laurencin

Marie Laurencin (1881956) was born in Paris, where she was raised by her mother and lived much of her life. At 18, she studied porcelain painting in Sèvres She then returned to Paris and continued her art education at the Académie Humbert, where she changed her focus to oil painting.
During the early years of the 20th century, Laurencin was an important figure in the Parisian avant-garde. A member of both the circle of Pablo Picasso and Cubists associated with the Section d'Or, such as Jean Metzinger Robert DelaunayHenri le Fauconnier and Francis Picabia, exhibiting with them at the Salon des Indépendants (1910-1911) and the Salon d'Automne (1911-1912), and Galeries Dalmau (1912) at the first Cubist exhibition in Spain. She became romantically involved with the poet Guillaume Apollinaire, and has often been identified as his muse. In addition, Laurencin had important connections to the salon of the American expatriate and famed lesbian writer Natalie Clifford Barney.
During the First World War, Laurencin left France for exile in Spain with her German-born husband, Baron Otto von Waëtjen, since through her marriage she had automatically lost her French citizenship. The couple subsequently lived together briefly in Düsseldorf. After they divorced in 1920, she returned to Paris, where she achieved financial success as an artist until the economic depression of the 1930s. During the 1930s she worked as an art instructor at a private school. She lived in Paris until her death.


1923 September 1
Autumn Fabrics & Original Vogue Designs
Cover by Georges Lepape

1923 October 1
Early Paris Openings
Cover by Georges Lepape

1923 October 15
Paris Fashions
Cover by Eduardo Garcia Benito

1923 November 1
New York Winter Fashions
Cover by Eduard Buk Ulreich

Eduard Buk Ulreich (889-1966) was born in Koszeg, Hungary / Austria in 1889, and moved with his family to New York as a child. He was a pupil of Mlle. F. Blumberg and studied at the Kansas City Art Institute and the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts. Working as a mural designer for the WPA, he created frescos and mosaics and tapestries for buildings throughout the mid-West and East Coast during the late 1930s and 1940s.

Along with his wife, artist Nura Woodson Ulreich, he was an illustrator for books and magazines. Memberships included the Guild of Free Lance Artists. He exhibited widely including at the Art Institute of Chicago, Corcoran Gallery, Anderson Gallery, Whitney Museum of American Art and Gump's Gallery in San Francisco. Ulreich would sign his work "BUK", which is sometimes confused with American author and sometime artist Charles Bukowski, who also used "Buk" as a signature.



1923 December 1
Christmas Gifts Number
Cover by Georges Lepape

1923 December 15
Cover by André E. Marty
André Édouard Marty (1882-1974) was a Parisian artist who worked mainly in the classic Art Deco style. Marty studied at the École des Beaux-Arts and Atelier Fernand Cormon in Montmartre, Paris. He was appointed on the jury for the 1925 Exposition internationale des Arts décoratifs et industriels modernes, from which the Art Deco movement took its name.
Marty was one of only four artists to contribute to every year of La Gazette du bon ton a leading pochoir fashion magazine in Paris and in Europe (1912 to 1925).
As well as in Vogue, Marty also had illustrations published in Harper's Bazaar, Vanity FairHouse & Garden, Le Sourire, Fémina, Modes et Manières d’Aujourd’hui and Comoedia Illustre, among others.

He also illustrated numerous books and designed advertisements and theatre posters (including a number of famous ones for the Ballets Russes and the Théâtre National de l'Opéra in 1910). During the 1910s, he worked with Georges Peignot on typographic vignettes and ornaments for the prestigious G. Peignot et Fils foundry. In the 1930s Marty worked as a costume and set designer for the theatre, cinema and ballet. Later he also produced designs for enamel vases, plates and jewellery.


1923 Illustration for Vogue by Porter Woodruff

Porter Woodruff (1894-1959) was one of five American fashion illustrators Vogue had based in Paris in the early 1920s. He continued illustrating for Vogue through the 1930s, residing in New York and Tunisia, as well as Paris. He died in Tunisia. Besides Vogue, he contributed covers to House & Garden magazine (another Condé Naste publication) around the time of WW1, before moving to Paris.

1924 January 1
Midwinter Travel
Cover by Georges Lepape

1924 February 15
A Forecast of Spring Fashions
Cover by George Wolfe Plank

1924 March 15
Spring Shopping Number
Cover by Pierre Brissaud

1924 April 1
Early Paris Openings & Brides Number
Cover by George Wolfe Plank

1924 May 1
Illustration by Harriet Meserole

1924 June 1
Summer Fashions
Cover by Georges Lepape

1924 June 15
Summer Travel Number
Cover by George Wolfe Plank

1924 July 1
Hot Weather Fashions
Cover by Georges Lepape

1924 July 15
Cover by Harriet Meserole

1924 September 1
Autumn Fabrics & Original Vogue Designs
Cover by George Wolfe Plank

1924 October 1
Early Paris Openings
Cover by Harriet Meserole

1924 October 15
Paris Fashions Number
Cover by Georges Lepape

1924 November 1
New York Winter Fashions
Cover by George Wolfe Plank

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