Monday, 29 June 2020

Tom Browne - part 6



Tom Browne  (1870 – 1910) was an extremely popular English strip cartoonist, painter and illustrator of the late Victorian and Edwardian periods.
Browne started earning a wage as a milliner's errand boy in 1882. From there he was apprenticed to a lithographic printer and eked out a living with freelance cartoons for London comic papers. He received 30 shillings for his first strip, published by the magazine “Scraps,” and called "He Knew How To Do It".
Comic Cuts, a British comic book was founded by Alfred Harmsworth in 1890. Cheaply printed, it proved to be the ideal medium for Browne's bold drawing style. Browne's comic strips soon became so popular that he moved to London and into a studio in Wollaton House at Westcombe Park, London. Here he turned out six full-page strips a week, but also managed to produce illustrations for several British magazines. His cartoons appeared in the magazines Punch, The Tatler and other highly rated periodicals of the day. The logo of Johnnie Walker whiskey, the strutting, monocled character, was created by Browne in 1908.
Browne was a founding member of the London Sketch Club, was publicly acclaimed and was made a “Royal Illustrator.” His cycling trips took him all over the world, while illustrations of these exploits appeared in the newspapers. Returning to Nottingham, he started a colour printing firm and joined the Territorial Army. 
He also created the comic strip Weary Willie and Tired Tim, inspired by Don Quixote and Sancho Panza, which appeared on the front page of Illustrated Chips from 1896 to 1953. Browne played a major part in the evolution of the British comic style, influencing Bruce Bairnsfather, Didley Watkins and Leo Baxendale. His strip 'Airy Alf and Bouncing Billy' first appeared in The Big Budget around 1900, and was later continued by Ralph Hodgson aka "Yorick". His comic, Dan Leno, portrayed the Victorian English music hall comedian and appeared in Dan Leno's Comic Journal in 1898. Echoes of his impudent urchins can still be seen in The Beano and The Dandy comics today.

More of his characters were 'Little Willy and Tiny Tim', 'Mr. Stankey Deadstone and Company', 'The Rajah' and 'Don Quixote de Tintogs'. Browne died after surgery for cancer at the age of 39. He was buried with military honours at Shooter’s Hill.

For more information on Browne see part 1.
For earlier works see parts 1 - 5 also.
This is part 6 of 9 parts on the works of Tom Browne:



"Me 'it 'im? Why, I never touched 'im. I ain't never done any arm to nobody, I ain'y."

"That you Flossie darling? Yes, the wife's out just now. I'll meet you tonight. Yhratre and supper at the Savo-

"The amateur photographer."
Taking the baby.

"The art of leaving one's purse at home."
"Hang it all, I've left my money at home."

"The art of leaving one's purse at home."
"Sorry I can't pay for these whiskies and cigars I ordered. Forgot to bring my money with me."

"The art of leaving one's purse at home."
 "Awfully sorry I can't pay. Left my money at home."

 "The art of leaving one's purse at home."
"Left you purse at home? Allow me to pay your fare."

"The art of leaving one's purse at home." 
'Left me bloomin' purse at home.'

"The Captain" No.1.
How Jim took exercise.

"The Captain" No.5.
How Jim took exercise

"The Captain" No.6.
How Jim took exercise

"The money must be paid at once."
"Oh m'Lud give me time."
"Right. Twelve months hard labour."

"The new Compensation Act."
Cook "This is the best stroke of luck I've had."

"The Pierrots."
"What! Two of 'em!!"

"The Pierrots."
One for Father

"The Pierrots."
First Step

"The Pierrots."
Happy Days.

"The Pierrots."
Oft in the stilly night.

"Tiens. I haf 'im now"

"Touched"

"Uncle Podger"
Uncle Podger gives Pa and Ma a little advise on matrimony.

"Uncle Podger."
Uncle Podger tells a funny? story.

"Uncle Podger."
Uncle Podger finds the key of the wine-cellar.

"Uncle Podger."
Uncle Podger plays "Elephants" with the children.

"Uncle Podger."
Uncle Podger shews the children how to play cricket,

"Uncle Podger."
Uncle Podger snores.

"Up the river."
"Good heavens! What's that?"

"Up the river."
"Hi! Clumsy!!"

"Up the river."
Into the bank.

"Wanted a Wife"
His breakfast.

"Wanted a Wife"
His only pair.

"Wanted a Wife"
He goes shopping

"Wanted a Wife"
He washes a few things.

"Wanted a Wife"
His landlady's cat developes (sic) a fondness for his tea.

"Wanted a Wife"
His little bill.

"Watch his eggspression."

"We - hic - won' go 'ome till mornin' - hic"

"What is a home without a plumber."
He goes away from his job to buy some putty.

"What is a home without a plumber."
He leaves the water tap running.

"What is a home without a plumber."
The Bill.

"What is a home without a plumber."
The gas explosion. He omits to plug up the hole in the gas pipe.

"What is home without a plumber"
Hard at work.

"What is home without a plumber"
He finishes the job.

"What the - !!! Who the - !!! What's that? Girl at the Exchange? Oh! I'm frightfully sorry. Thought it was my wife."

"What the ----?"

"What's that thing?"
"That is my patent buffer. When I fall down, it bounces me on to my feet again"

"You can't diddle me."
"Perfelly shober - hic - I 'sure you."

"You j'e'st leave my chickens alone. Whiskers."

11.30 p.m.

A few cast-off clothes.

A gay old dog on Yokohama.

A grand day for golf

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