Friday, 8 November 2019

Charles Dana Gibson - part 10



Born in Roxbury, Massachusetts, Charles Dana Gibson attended the Art Students League in New York, studying with Thomas Eakins and Kenyon Cox. Hugely successful at the turn of the century, he left New York from 1905 to 1907 to study painting in France, Spain, and Italy.

Gibson's name is still remembered for its association with the icon he created, the "Gibson Girl." This idealised, refined upper-middle-class woman became so popular that she was featured in stage plays, and her image was printed on a variety of domestic objects. The highest-paid illustrator of his time, in 1904 Gibson accepted a contract from Collier's Weekly, which paid him $100,000 for one hundred illustrations over four years. Gibson's illustrations gently satirised public life and mores. During World War I, as president of the Society of Illustrators, Gibson formed and became head of the Division of Pictorial Publicity under the Federal Committee of Public Information. Through this program, prominent illustrators were recruited to design posters, billboards, and other publicity for the war effort. His involvement with publicity during the war led Gibson to become owner and editor of Life, a New York-based magazine filled with short articles and illustrations. In the early 1930s Gibson retired in order to devote more time to painting.

For more information about Charles Dana Gibson see part 1, and for earlier works see parts 1 - 9 also. 

This is part 10 of a 12-part series on the works of Charles Dana Gibson:



1906 Studies in Expression.
 When a Debutante meets eligible Young Men of her Mother's Acquaintance.

Life Publishing Co.

1906 Studies in Expression.
While a Spanish-American hero describes the horrors of war.
Life Publishing Co.

1906 The Gibson Girl - Sketches.
lithograph

1906 The Overworked American Father.
His Day Off in August.
Life Publishing Co.

1906c Between times, Leicester Square
pen and ink
Library of Congress, Washington, DC

1906c Gibson Girl from The Gibson Book Volume 1
published by Charles Scribner's Sons, New York

1906c Lost
pen and ink
Library of Congress, Washington, DC

1907 Advertisement for The American Queen magazine

1907 At a Comedy

1907 At Three In The Afternoon.
 "'Hello, old man! Been up all night?"
 "No; I'm going to take a Harlem Girl to a Theatre Party in Brooklyn."
Life Publishing Co. 

1907 Gibson Girls

1907 Too Late?

1907c Home again - as the Steamer docks
pen and ink
Library of Congress, Washington, DC

1907c The Wonders of Palmistry
In which he is told that he will marry a blonde who loves him, but he will have to speak quick.

1908 Life magazine cover
April 19 1908

1909 Collier's magazine cover
September 23 1909

1909 Collier's magazine cover
 October 30 1909

1909 Gibson Girl

1909 Girl sitting in a chair

1909 No Time for Politics
P.F. Collier & Son

1909 The Day Dream

1909 The Sign Painter

1909c A Daughter of the South
pen and ink 57 x 40 cm (sheet)
Library of Congress, Washington, DC

1909c Effect of the Marathon Craze
pen and ink
Library of Congress, Washington, DC

1909c One of our Leisure Class
pen and ink
Library of Congress, Washington, DC

1909c The Debutante

1910 A Ballad of Olden Days

1910 Collier's magazine cover
 October 29 1910

1910-11 Molly Bawn
pen and ink
Library of Congress, Washington, DC

1910c I know perfectly well that this isn't right, she said, helping him and then herself; but I am wondering what there is about it that isn't right
 pen and ink
Library of Congress, Washington, DC

1910c Patience
pen and ink
Library of Congress, Washington, DC

1910c Sweetest Story ever Told
pen and ink over graphite. 57.7 x 43.5 cm
Library of Congress, Washington, DC

1911 "Then You'll Remember Me"
P.F. Collier & Sons

1911 About This Time of the Year the Woods Are Full of Them
Life Publishing Co.

1911 Day Dreams
Collier's Weekly

1911 Gibson Girl
New York Sunday World

1911 Other People by Charles Dana Gibson
 published by Charles Scribner's Sons, New York & John Lane, London

1911 Rita was not at home when Valerie came into their little apartment; the parrot greeted her, shrieking from his perch
pen and ink

1911 The Débutant
 published by The Abbott & Briggs Co.
October 1911

1911 When the Sap Begins to Flow
published by P.F. Colier & Son
April 1911

1911c Bearded man in top hat waving cane
pen and ink
Library of Congress, Washington, DC

1911c Free Lunch
New York Public Library

1911c I want you to like me, Jose; I want to be able to like you; I shall have need of friends, she said half to herself
pen and ink
Library of Congress, Washington, DC

1911c Valerie was busy, exceedingly busy, arranging matters, in view of the great change impending
pen and ink
Library of Congress, Washington, DC

1912 Collier's magazine
 March 16 1912

1912 from Japonette by Robert W. Chambers

1912 The reason dinner was late
pen and ink over graphite 46.7 x 74 cm
Library of Congress, Washington, DC

1912c Among those not invited
pen and ink
Library of Congress, Washington, DC

1913 Friends for Forty Years
Advertisement for the Mongtomery Ward Department Store Catalogue

1913 McClure's magazine cover
January 1913

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