Friday, 31 August 2018

Piet Mondrian - part 9



Piet Mondrian was the leading artist of the 'De Stijl' (the style) movement, a group of Dutch artists who produced strictly geometric, abstract art. Mondrian's early work painted from nature became increasingly abstract. For example a series of studies of trees and their branches made from 1909 to 1913 evolved into a criss-cross of lines. However it was when he became a member of the Theosophist group that he began to paint the grid paintings with which he is associated. Theosophists saw existence in terms of harmony between male and female, positive and negative, horizontal and vertical. Mondrian's paintings embody this sense of balance. 

Note: Many pieces by Piet Mondrian have been omitted from this series as they are deemed to be held in copyright.

For a broader biography see part 1 also. For earlier works by Mondrian, see parts 1 - 8 also.

This is part 9 of 9-part series on the works of Piet Mondrian:



1934-35 Composition ( No.IV ) White - Blue
oil on canvas 99 x 70.3 cm
Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art, Hartford, CT

1934-36 Composition No. I / Composition C. / Composition White and Blue
oil on canvas 121.3 x 59 cm

1935 Composition ( No. 1 ) Grey-Red
oil on canvas 57.5 x 55.6 cm
Art Institute of Chicago, IL

1935 Composition A, with Double Line and Yellow
 oil on canvas 59 x 56 cm
Private Collection

1935 Composition B ( No.II ) with Red
oil on canvas 80.3 x 63.3 cm
Tate, London

1935 Composition C ( No. III ) with Red, Yellow, and Blue
oil on canvas 56.2 x 55.1 cm
Private Collection

1935 Composition with double line and blue ( unfinished )
oil on canvas 60 x 50 cm
Museum of Modern Art Foundation, Vienna

1935 Composition with Double Line and Blue
oil on canvas 71.1 x 68.9 cm
Beyerler Collection, Basel, Switzerland

1935-42 Composition with Red, Yellow, and Blue
 oil on canvas 101 x 51 cm

1935-42c Rhythm of Black Lines
oil on canvas 72.2 x 69.5 cm
Kunstsammlung Nordrhein-Westfalen, Dusseldorf, Germany

1936 Composition ( B ) in Blue, Yellow and White
oil on canvas 43.5 x 33.5 cm
 Kunstmuseum, Basel, Switzerland

1936 Composition in White, Black, and Red
 oil on canvas 102.2 x 104.1 cm
Museum of Modern Art, New York

1936 Composition in White, Blue and Yellow: C
oil on canvas 70.5 x 68.5 cm
Private Collection

1936 Composition in White, Red and Blue
 oil on canvas 98.5 x 80.3 cm
Staatsgaleire, Stuttgart, Germany

1936 Composition in White, Red, and Yellow
oil on canvas 80 x 62.2 cm
Los Angeles County Museum of Art, CA

1936 Composition with White and Red
oil on canvas 50.5 x 51.4 cm
Philadelphia Museum of Art, PA

1936 Composition with Yellow
oil on canvas 73 x 66.2 cm
 Philadelphia Museum of Art, PA

1936 Vertical Composition with Blue and White
 oil on canvas 121.3 x 59 cm
Kunstsammlung Nordrhein-Westfalen, Dusseldorf, Germany

1936-42 Composition No. 12 with Blue
oil on canvas 62 x 60.3 cm
National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa

1937 Composition in Red, Blue and White: II
oil on canvas 75 x 60.5 cm
Musée National d'Art Moderne, Paris

1937 Composition in Yellow, Blue, and White, I
oil on canvas 57.1 x 55.2 cm
Museum of Modern Art, New York

1937 Opposition of Lines, Reds and Yellow
oil on canvas 43.5 x 33.7 cm
Philadelphia Museum of Art, PA

1937-42 Composition in Red, Blue, and Yellow
oil on canvas 60.3 x 55.4 cm
Museum of Modern Art, New York

1937-42 Composition No. 7, with Red and Blue
oil on canvas 80.5 x 62.2 cm
Munson-Williams-Proctor Institute, Museum of Art, Utica, NY

1937-42 Composition with Red, Blue and Yellow
oil on canvas 72.2 x 69.5 cm
Kunstsammlung Nordrhein-Westfalen, Düsseldorf, Germany

1937-42 Composition with Yellow, Blue and Red
oil on canvas 72.7 x 69.2 cm
Tate, London

1937-43 Picture II. With Yellow, Red, and Blue
oil on canvas 60 x 55 cm
Moderna Museet, Stockholm, Sweden

1938 Composition ( unfinished )
charcoal on canvas 115 x 115 cm
 Collection Emily Fisher Landau, New York

1938-39 Composition ( unfinished )
charcoal on canvas 70 x 72 cm
Private Collection


1938 Composition No. 2 / Composition of Red, Blue, Yellow and White
 oil on canvas 44.6 x 38.2 cm
The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles

1938 Lozenge Composition with Eight Lines and Red / Picture No. III
oil on canvas 100 x 100 cm
Beyeler Collection, Basel, Switzerland


1938-39 Composition No. 1 with Grey and Red 1938 / Composition with Red 1939
oil on canvas laid down on panel 109.1 x 106 cm
The Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation
Peggy Guggenheim Collection, Venice
© 2007 Mondrian/Holtzman Trust

1938-39 Composition with Red
oil on canvas laid down on panel 105.2 x 102.3 cm
Peggy Guggenheim Collection, Venice

1938-42 Composition No. 9 with Yellow and Red
oil on canvas 79.7 x 74 cm
Phillips Collection, Washington, DC

1938-42 Composition No. 10 with Blue, Yellow, and Red
oil on canvas 79.5 x 73 cm
Private Collection

1938-42 Composition of Red and White: Nom 1 Composition 4 with Red and Blue
oil on canvas 100.3 x 99.1 cm
Saint Louis Art Museum, MO

1938-43 Place de la Concorde
oil on canvas 93.9 x 94.4 cm
© Dallas Museum of Art, Texas

1939-42 Composition No. 8 with Red, Blue, and Yellow
oil on canvas 75.2 x 68.1 cm
Kimbell Art Museum, Fort Worth, Texas

1939-43 Trafalgar Square

In September 1938 Mondrian moved from Paris to London to escape the threat of a German invasion. There he made Trafalgar Square, the first in a series of paintings titled after locations in cities that gave him refuge during World War II. 
The small, subtly textured planes of primary colours that seem to vibrate within their black perimeters are smaller and their arrangement more syncopated than in many of the artists earlier canvases: colour segments expand across two rectangular fields in the larger black grid, and thickened blocks of black function as both line and plane 
( at lower right, for example ). 
The date "39–43" inscribed on the original canvas stretcher suggests that Mondrian revisited this painting after his flight to New York in 1940 to escape the escalating war.


1939-43 Trafalgar Square
oil on canvas 145.2 x 120 cm
Museum of Modern Art, New York

1940-41 Study for a Composition
collage of cut and pasted papers, prepared with gouache and charcoal, on pieced cream wove newsprint in three parts with charcoal on verso 33 x 27 cm
Art Institute of Chicago, IL

1940-42 Composition No.11 - London, with Blue, Red and Yellow
oil on canvas 82.5 x 71.1 cm
Albright Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, NY

1941 Composition with Red and Blue
oil on canvas 43.5 x 33 cm
Private Collection

1941 New York City 1 ( unfinished )
oil and painted strips on canvas 119 x 115 cm
Kunstsammlung Nordrhein-Westfalen, Düsseldorf, Germany

1941 New York City 2 ( unfinished )
charcoal and painted paper strips on canvas 115.7 x 99 cm
Private Collection

1941 New York City, 3 ( unfinished )
oil, pencil, chalk and coloured tape on canvas 117 x 110 cm
Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza, Madrid

1941-42 New York / Boogie Woogie
oil on canvas 95.2 x 92 cm

1942 New York City
oil on canvas 119.3 x 114.2 cm
Musée National d'Art Moderne, Paris

1942-43 Broadway Boogie Woogie

Mondrian, who had escaped to New York from Europe after the outbreak of World War II, delighted in the city's architecture. He was also fascinated by American jazz, particularly boogie-woogie, finding its syncopated beat, irreverent approach to melody, and improvisational aesthetic akin to what he called, in his own work, the "destruction of natural appearance; and construction through continuous opposition of pure means—dynamic rhythm." 
In this painting, his penultimate, Mondrian replaced the black grid that had long governed his canvases with predominantly yellow lines that intersect at points marked by squares of blue and red. These atomized bands of stuttering chromatic pulses, interrupted by light grey, create paths across the canvas suggesting the city's grid, the movement of traffic, and blinking electric lights, as well as the rhythms of jazz.

Notes from Museum of Modern Art, New York


1942-43 Broadway Boogie Woogie
oil on canvas 127 x 127 cm
Museum of Modern Art, New York

1943-44 Victory Boogie Woogie
oil on paper laid down on canvas 126 x 126 cm
Gemeentemuseum Den Haag, The Hague, Netherlands