Friday, 3 July 2020

Tom Browne - part 8

Tom Browne  (1870 – 1910) was an extremely popular English strip cartoonist, painter and illustrator of the late Victorian and Edwardian periods.
Browne started earning a wage as a milliner's errand boy in 1882. From there he was apprenticed to a lithographic printer and eked out a living with freelance cartoons for London comic papers. He received 30 shillings for his first strip, published by the magazine “Scraps,” and called "He Knew How To Do It".
Comic Cuts, a British comic book was founded by Alfred Harmsworth in 1890. Cheaply printed, it proved to be the ideal medium for Browne's bold drawing style. Browne's comic strips soon became so popular that he moved to London and into a studio in Wollaton House at Westcombe Park, London. Here he turned out six full-page strips a week, but also managed to produce illustrations for several British magazines. His cartoons appeared in the magazines Punch, The Tatler and other highly rated periodicals of the day. The logo of Johnnie Walker whiskey, the strutting, monocled character, was created by Browne in 1908.
Browne was a founding member of the London Sketch Club, was publicly acclaimed and was made a “Royal Illustrator.” His cycling trips took him all over the world, while illustrations of these exploits appeared in the newspapers. Returning to Nottingham, he started a colour printing firm and joined the Territorial Army. 
He also created the comic strip Weary Willie and Tired Tim, inspired by Don Quixote and Sancho Panza, which appeared on the front page of Illustrated Chips from 1896 to 1953. Browne played a major part in the evolution of the British comic style, influencing Bruce Bairnsfather, Didley Watkins and Leo Baxendale. His strip 'Airy Alf and Bouncing Billy' first appeared in The Big Budget around 1900, and was later continued by Ralph Hodgson aka "Yorick". His comic, Dan Leno, portrayed the Victorian English music hall comedian and appeared in Dan Leno's Comic Journal in 1898. Echoes of his impudent urchins can still be seen in The Beano and The Dandy comics today.

More of his characters were 'Little Willy and Tiny Tim', 'Mr. Stankey Deadstone and Company', 'The Rajah' and 'Don Quixote de Tintogs'. Browne died after surgery for cancer at the age of 39. He was buried with military honours at Shooter’s Hill.

For more information on Browne see part 1.
For earlier works see parts 1 - 7 also.
This is part 8 of 9 parts on the works of Tom Browne:


A soldier and a man

Ever of thee I am fondly dreaming

Maggie Murphy's home


Extremes meet.

Fuss about a Trifle.
 "Clumsy brute !!!"

Fuss about a Trifle.
Pa boards a tram car.

Fuss about a Trifle.
Pa objects to his young hopeful smoking cigarettes.

In the paddock.

In the park

Loading a pill for somebody.

Love must be blind.

Ma "Hullo! Who's there?'
Burglar "Nobody"
Ma "Ah! I must have been mistaken"
Turns over & goes to sleep again

May good luck be out-poured on you this Christmas.
Homeward Bound. Gone Lame.

May you clasp the hand of good fortune with a firm grip this Christmas.
United, we stand, Divided, we fall.

Mother-in-law arrives on a few day's visit.

Mother-in-Law the peace-maker.

Mother-In-Law departs.

Motoring in the City.
Getting mixed

Motoring is so exciting.

My word! If I can catch you bending -

Off duty.

On their Honeymoon,
"Tickets please"

On their honeymoon,
The arrival at the hotel

On their Honeymoon,
The first tiff.

One for the Caddy.

"One touch of Nature makes the whole World kin."
 Fry's Chocolate advertisement

Our Little Ailments.
Aunt Maria has the mumps.

Our Little Ailments.
Ma has a cold & cannot speak.
"Been kept late at the office my dear"

Partridge shooting.
A nervous gun.

Possession is nine points of the law.

Pre-historic motor car

Reggie does not appreciate mother-in-law's pets.

Rustic- "Say Mister. Can you play the "Ole Bull an' Bush?"

Salisbury Cathedral.

Something gone wrong

Spooning.
In a dog-cart

Spooning.
On the Heath.

Spooning.
On the Pier.

Spooning.
On the stile.

Spooning.
Up the river.

Spooning.
Widow and Widower

Rugby Football series:


"Football."
"Who's got the ball?"

"Well! That's a Try anyway."

A Mark

A Try

Are we downhearted? No !!!

Take him low

Touch

Well tackled

Wednesday, 1 July 2020

Tom Browne - part 7

Tom Browne Self-Portrait

Tom Browne  (1870 – 1910) was an extremely popular English strip cartoonist, painter and illustrator of the late Victorian and Edwardian periods.
Browne started earning a wage as a milliner's errand boy in 1882. From there he was apprenticed to a lithographic printer and eked out a living with freelance cartoons for London comic papers. He received 30 shillings for his first strip, published by the magazine “Scraps,” and called "He Knew How To Do It".
Comic Cuts, a British comic book was founded by Alfred Harmsworth in 1890. Cheaply printed, it proved to be the ideal medium for Browne's bold drawing style. Browne's comic strips soon became so popular that he moved to London and into a studio in Wollaton House at Westcombe Park, London. Here he turned out six full-page strips a week, but also managed to produce illustrations for several British magazines. His cartoons appeared in the magazines Punch, The Tatler and other highly rated periodicals of the day. The logo of Johnnie Walker whiskey, the strutting, monocled character, was created by Browne in 1908.
Browne was a founding member of the London Sketch Club, was publicly acclaimed and was made a “Royal Illustrator.” His cycling trips took him all over the world, while illustrations of these exploits appeared in the newspapers. Returning to Nottingham, he started a colour printing firm and joined the Territorial Army. 
He also created the comic strip Weary Willie and Tired Tim, inspired by Don Quixote and Sancho Panza, which appeared on the front page of Illustrated Chips from 1896 to 1953. Browne played a major part in the evolution of the British comic style, influencing Bruce Bairnsfather, Didley Watkins and Leo Baxendale. His strip 'Airy Alf and Bouncing Billy' first appeared in The Big Budget around 1900, and was later continued by Ralph Hodgson aka "Yorick". His comic, Dan Leno, portrayed the Victorian English music hall comedian and appeared in Dan Leno's Comic Journal in 1898. Echoes of his impudent urchins can still be seen in The Beano and The Dandy comics today.

More of his characters were 'Little Willy and Tiny Tim', 'Mr. Stankey Deadstone and Company', 'The Rajah' and 'Don Quixote de Tintogs'. Browne died after surgery for cancer at the age of 39. He was buried with military honours at Shooter’s Hill.

For more information on Browne see part 1.
For earlier works see parts 1 - 6 also.
This is part 7 of 9 parts on the works of Tom Browne:



A lock catastophe

A scrimmage.

A thorough sportsman.

A-hunting we will go!

After 10 minutes talk, "What's that! Don't know what I'm talking about? Who the D---l are you? 658? Ring off you blithering idiot. I want 698."

An absorbing game

Are we down-hearted? No !!!

Are we down-hearted? No !!!

Are we down-hearted? No !!!

Arry on the Margate boat
Bunkered

Croquet.

Deaf old lady -
"Ah! I can distinctly hear a bee humming, somewhere."

Dirty boy
"Naa then, clumsy. Where are yer comn' to?
"

British Castles:


Balmoral Castle

Belvoir Castle.

Cricket series:


"Humours of cricket."
Too many cooks spoil the broth.

Cricket illustrated.
A closed mouth catcheth no flies

Cricket Illustrated.
A collision in mid-wicket.

Going in.

Illustrated Sports.
Cricket

Every Day Phrases
Cigarette cards:


A card reverse side

"Bring your music with you."

"Delighted to meet you!"

"Do not disappoint me."

"Drop in when you are passing"

"Give us a call"

"I am going away for a short time."

"I am in doubt."

"I don't like your treatment"

"I feel run down"

"I shall be engaged tonight!"

"I shall make a report"

"I will look you up."

"My hands are full just now."

"Send me a line."

"So sorry you can't stop."

"Take my tip."

"You will pardon me. I hope"

Football series:


Rival Captains. Was that a goal or not?
Referee - I-I-I d-d-don't know.

A full back.

A throw in.

Captain. "Blow your whistle that's a foul"
Referee "Can't, I've swallowed it."

Fisting out the ball.

Foul.

Goal !

Head work.