Monday, 23 January 2017

Louis Wain - part 10

Louis William Wain (1860 – 1939) was an English artist best known for his illustrations of anthropomorphised large-eyed cats and kittens. His illustrations showed cats playing musical instruments, serving tea, playing cards, fishing, smoking, and enjoying a night at the opera. Wain was a prolific artist, sometimes producing as many as several hundred drawings a year.

For more biographical notes, and for earlier works, see parts 1 - 9 also.

This is part 10 of 10 – part series on the works of Louis Wain:


"Family Fun" cover by Louis Wain
published by Raphael Tuck & Sons

"Christmas Time in Catland"
"Family Fun" illustration by Louis Wain
published by Raphael Tuck & Sons

Fun in Dogland with Louis Wain
Painting Book published by Raphael Tuck & Sons

Fun in Dogland with Louis Wain 
Painting Book published by Raphael Tuck & Sons

"I'm tired of waiting!"
postcard published by Raphael Tuck & Sons

Mixed Pickles by Louis Wain
Father Tuck's "Welcome Gift" Series
published by Raphael Tuck & Sons

"Mixed Sweets" from "My Playtime Book"
published by Raphael Tuck & Sons

Motor-Car Pirates

My Mascot Postcard Painting Book by Louis Wain
published by Raphael Tuck & Sons

My Mascot Postcard Painting Book by Louis Wain 
published by Raphael Tuck & Sons

My Mascot Postcard Painting Book by Louis Wain 
published by Raphael Tuck & Sons

"One of the K-nuts"
postcard

"Paws and Claws"
postcard

Playtime in Pussyland book cover
Father Tuck's "Wonderland" Series
published by Raphael Tuck and Sons

Postcard

Seaside Joys

Set title; Stripes to the front
"Five to Four on!"
"Oilette" postcard by Raphael Tuck & Sons

Set title; Stripes to the front 
"Love Tales"  
"Oilette" postcard by Raphael Tuck & Sons

Set title; Stripes to the front
"Woman came after man, and it has been after him ever since! Lucky man!"
"Oilette" postcard by Raphael Tuck & Sons

Set title; Taking the Harrogate Waters series III
"Come and try"
"Oilette" postcard by Raphael Tuck & Sons

Set title; Taking the Harrogate Waters series III 
"I don't think!"
"Oilette" 
postcard by Raphael Tuck & Sons

Set title; Taking the Harrogate Waters series III 
"I'm afraid it won't keep down!"
"Oilette" 
postcard by Raphael Tuck & Sons

Set title; Taking the Harrogate Waters series III 
"Keep it down that's the thing!"
"Oilette" 
postcard by Raphael Tuck & Sons

Set title; Taking the Harrogate Waters series III 
"Oh that this too, too solid flesh would melt"
"Oilette" 
postcard by Raphael Tuck & Sons

Set title; Taking the Harrogate Waters series III 
"Perhaps if I hold my nose it will go down easier!"
"Oilette" 
postcard by Raphael Tuck & Sons

"Tea time"

The Catland ABC by Louis Wain
published by Raphael Tuck & Sons

The Painter
postcard

The Student
postcard

"The Photographer on the Sands"
Wrench Series postcard


The Tale of Naughty Kitty Cat
illustrated by Louis Wain

"There's luck for you!"
"Oilette" postcard by Raphael Tuck & Sons

"Theres a mouse in that corner!"

Three Little Kittens by Louis Wain
Father Tuck's "Pictureland" Series
published by Raphael Tuck & Sons

Three Little Kittens by Louis Wain
Father Tuck's "Pictureland" Series  
published by Raphael Tuck & Sons

Three Little Kittens by Louis Wain
Father Tuck's "Pictureland" Series  
published by Raphael Tuck & Sons

"Three of Kissingen"
"Oilette" postcard by Raphael Tuck & Sons

"Throw physic to the dogs."
 postcard

"To My Valentine"
postcard

Toms Night Out

"Trespassers Will be Scratched / Dressing Room"

"Trouble for the Cat Scouts"
postcard

Two kittens

"Under the Mistletoe"
postcard

"We had a pleasant journey"
postcard

"Weather"

"Will you be my Valentine?"
postcard

Late works from Louis Wain's so-called "Schzophrenic" period - to recap:
When his sisters could no longer cope with his erratic and occasionally violent behaviour, Wain was finally committed to a pauper ward of Springfield Mental Hospital in Tooting, London, in 1924. A year later, he was discovered there and his circumstances were widely publicised, leading to appeals from such figures as H.G. Wells and the personal intervention of the Prime Minister. Wain was transferred to the Bethlem Royal Hospital in Southwark, and again in 1930 to Napsbury Hospital near St Albans in Hertfordshire, north of London. This hospital was relatively pleasant, with a garden and colony of cats, and he spent his final 15 years there in peace. While he became increasingly deluded, his erratic mood swings subsided, and he continued drawing for pleasure. His work from this period is marked by bright colours, flowers, and intricate and abstract patterns, though his primary subject remained the same.