Wednesday, 14 October 2015

Trade Cards - part 6

The Woolson Spice Company, Easter Greetings
Victorian trade cards became an early form of collectible advertising, particularly in the United States. Popularised after the Civil war by businesses, they offer a colourful and diverse look at popular culture and society in the late 1800s.

The advent of lithography in the 1870s made it possible to mass-produce them in colour, leading to a golden age from 1876 to the early 1900s, when halftone printed newspaper and magazine advertisements became more economical.

Trade cards typically had a picture on one side and an advertisement on the other.

This is part 6 of a 6-part series on Trade Cards. For other examples see part 1 - 5 also.

Note: I have literally hundreds of digital trade cards from my research but couldn't show them all here. I will however start uploading them to my Pinterest site "Art House", which can be found here (copy and paste): 
https://uk.pinterest.com/poul0209/


The Weser Piano (die-cut)

The White Sewing Machine Co. Cleveland, Ohio

The White Sewing Machine Co. Cleveland, Ohio

Thorp, Hawley & Co., Detroit, MI (Fine Candies) (die-cut) 

Thurber's Fruit Preserves and Jellies

Thurston, Hall & Co. Crackers, Cambridgeport, Mass,

Tobacco

Trèvere Mousquetaire Gloves. Brown, Bolton & Co., New Haven, CT (die-cut - front)


Trèvere Mousquetaire Gloves. Brown, Bolton & Co., New Haven, CT (die-cut - back)

Van Houten's Cocoa (die-cut)

W. Ellis, Stationer (die-cut)

W. H. Read, Baltimore, MD (Cologne)

W. J.Burton & Co., Providence, RI (Pharmacists)

Warner & Merritt, Philadelphia, PA

Watson and McGill Tobacco, Petersburg, VA

Webb's Chocolate

Weir Stove Co., Taunton, MA

J.B. Williams' & Co., Soap

Willimantic Thread

Willimantic Thread

Wm. Broadhead & Sons, Jamestown, NY

Wm. Stuart (Furniture and Carpets)

Woolson Spice Co., Toledo, Ohio

Wright's Indian Vegetable Pills (die-cut)

Note: The remainder of the Trade Cards in this final part of the series are unused generic fronts of cards ready to be overprinted, ie. no advertising was overprinted onto these particular specimens.








































(embossed and die-cut)





(die-cut)



(die-cut)







(die-cut)

(die-cut)







(die-cut)

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